Dan Moody History

Dan Moody and his Williamson County legal team successfully prosecuted members of the Ku Klux Klan in the infamous Burleson flogging case. The trial took place in the early 1920s in the 26th District Courtroom of the Williamson County courthouse in Georgetown. This marked the first prosecution of the KKK that resulted in jail time. The ruling ultimately weakened the Klan, leading to the decline and downfall of the group on a national level. Moody’s victory did not go unnoticed, leading him to a successful bid for Attorney General of Texas in 1925. In an era of Ferguson dominated politics and corruption, Moody at the age of thirty-three was elected Governor of Texas—the youngest ever elected to that office. Moody’s administration focused on reform and fighting the culture of corruption previously established by the Ferguson administration. Moody restored confidence in the Texas government by recovering huge sums of public money in his crusade to expose corruption.

Dan Moody with group: Top row, left to right, Richard Critz, Dan Moody, Harry Graves; bottom row, J.F. Taulbee and W.H. Nunn. photo credit to Williamson County Museum

Dan Moody with group: Top row, left to right, Richard Critz, Dan Moody, Harry Graves; bottom row, J.F. Taulbee and W.H. Nunn. photo credit to Williamson County Museum

Williamson County Courthouse District Courtroom: Charles McMurray (county clerk) seated to the right; Judge Critz seated at center. Image ca. 1912. photo credit Williamson County Museum

Williamson County Courthouse District Courtroom: Charles McMurray (county clerk) seated to the right; Judge Critz seated at center. Image ca. 1912. photo credit Williamson County Museum